There is a company advertising that they'll provide auto repair customers peace of mind with a guarantee. If you're not happy, they'll set things straight. The fine print of the guarantee reveals a completely different message, however.

Image result for <a href=

To be clear, I haven't any personal gripe using this type of company. Their commercial just happened to exhibit someone typing in "auto repair" into the search bar. Intrigued, I made a decision to investigate. The TV ad shows images of helpful car repair people such as a tow truck driver, along with happy consumers - grateful because they've finally found someone they could trust. In essence, they're telling us that people don't need certainly to worry if we select among the service providers listed with them. Unfortunately, this type of protection is not really possible.

The specific terms and conditions behind the guarantee reveal that this system is going to do very little. It states that it makes no representations or guarantees. In other words, it's not any kind of binding car warranty.

Image result for <a href=

What's interesting is that the commercial fades of its way to suggest richmond towing services that they can relieve all our worries, but they do not pre-screen or review ANY of the firms that participate in the program. While there is a small reimbursement if you have a problem, you must prove it had been negligence on your time and at your expense.

There's nothing wrong with aggressive marketing - but it needs to be backed up. It has to have substance. Many auto repair companies cross the line by overpromising and under-delivering. When things sound too good to be true, it's because they often are. As it pertains to car repair and guarantees, we can't be too careful. Read the fine print.

Views: 17

Comment

You need to be a member of SMS Students, Alumni and Friends Foundation to add comments!

Join SMS Students, Alumni and Friends Foundation

© 2019   Created by Fountainhead.   Powered by

Badges  |  Report an Issue  |  Terms of Service